80% of all learning is visual:

Light entering the eye is sharply focused at the back of the eye, on the retina. This is “sight”. The brain interprets the image on the retina and we “see”. This is “vision”.

When both of these processes work correctly what we “see” is an accurate and useful interpretation of the world around us. Corrective glasses can ensure that the first of these processes is successful. But if the signal to the brain is somehow weakened, inaccurate or distorted all sorts of problems can occur (see further under “what is vision therapy”). It is those problems that are addressed and corrected by vision therapy.

Our goal is for our patients to obtain clear, comfortable and stable vision in all situations. Vision therapy provides the tool to obtain the goal.

Ocular Motor Skills
Marsden Ball Tracking

Notice the white ball in the picture. The young patient has his legs supported for balance and posture while tracking the letters on the white ball: an important skill for reading and arithmetic.

Balance and Gross Motor Skills

Studies as early as 1958 have shown that over 85% of children are not strong enough to sit properly at their desks. If you do not sit properly you disturb visual perception, create body stress, and each visual task requires excessive expenditure of energy.

Fine Motor
Eye – Hand Coordination

Your eyes do not coordinate with your hands, rather your hands move to where your eyes guide them. A student inserts pegs in specified locations on a rotating peg board, moving his hands into a position, guided by his eyes tracking.

Visual Perception
Pattern Blocks

Retraining the brain: Once you can see comfortably and move from one point in space to another effectively and accurately you have to be able to identify what you see, known as “higher visual functions”. This includes visual space relations, visual figure ground, visual memory, visual sequential memory, visual closure, visual discrimination, and visual form constancy.

Meet our team

Dr. Estelle J Roberts OD

Dr. Estelle Roberts is an OD, meaning doctor of optometry, with a 4 year professional degree, specializing solely in the health of the eye and in providing corrective eyewear.

Teresa Senel

“Mr. Joey” has a BA in visual communications and has worked in the video game industry – an interesting background for a vision therapist!

Dawn Smith

“Miss Dawn” has completed continuing education classes to further her understanding of vision therapy. From the College of Vision Development:

Joseph Rovinsky

“Mr. Joey” has a BA in visual communications and has worked in the video game industry – an interesting background for a vision therapist!