FAQ

What is vision?
Will my insurance cover vision therapy?
How many sessions are needed?
What home training is required?
Will I still need to wear glasses?
What is “lazy eye”?
I was told to wear an eye patch. Why?
What is the difference between an optometrist, an ophthalmologist and a vision therapist?
Do you outgrow vision problems.
Will I need vision therapy several times throughout my life?
What changes can I expect as the therapy progresses?
Will vision therapy help with sports?
I work on a computer most of the day and come home with a head ache – can vision therapy help?
Why was vision therapy recommended for my child who gets good grades in school?
What is the consequence of untreated vision problems?

What is vision?
Vision is the set of abilities needed for the brain to correctly interpret the visual input. If there is a problem these abilities can be improved through vision therapy.

Will my insurance cover vision therapy?
We accept most insurances. Your particular insurance policy will determine whether you are covered for vision therapy. We try as far as possible to help our patients find out to what extent they are covered.

How many sessions are needed?
This depends to some extent on how diligently the home training is carried out, but we know from experience that most children need 36 sessions. Adults may need as little as 12.

What home training is required?
At the end of each session the therapists will demonstrate and explain the home training. The activities should be done for 20 – 30 minutes a day. They could be spread over two sessions if preferred.

Will I still need to wear glasses?
That depends on the original reason for seeing an optometrist. There are some cases where the prescription for the glasses has to be changed as the therapy progresses.

What is “lazy eye”?
The correct term for “lazy eye” is amblyopia. One eye is not taking part in the vision process as much as the other. The reason for this is that one eye is not correctible to 20/20 due to refractive error, eye turn or occlusion (i.e. congenital cataract). There can be many consequences of this, among them lack of binocular vision (everything looks flat) and difficultly reading (apparent dyslexia). Through Vision therapy both eyes can be brought to work equally well and in concert.

I was told to wear an eye patch. Why?
Wearing an eye patch is a partial remedy for “lazy eye”. However, wearing a patch for any length of time carries problems of its own. It interferes with peripheral vision, and it does not do anything to “teach” both eyes to work together as is needed for proper binocular vision.

What is the difference between an optometrist, an ophthalmologist and a vision therapist?
An optometrist has four years of post-graduate professional training and residency exclusively for the purpose of correcting vision and monitor and treat diseases of the eye.
An ophthalmologist is an MD or DO who has had residency in ocular diseases. They treat eye diseases that require surgery and other invasive processes.
A vision therapist carries out the visual training which has been prescribed by an optometrist who specializes in vision problems (a behavioral optometrist). Our vision therapists are trained by Dr. Roberts and attend further formal education classes in vision and learning.

Do you outgrow vision problems.
No, on the contrary. Since 80% of our learning is visual vision problems are the underlying cause, either partly or wholly, of all forms of learning disability, ADHD, head aches, poor sports performance and a host of other problems. Only vision therapy can successfully address vision problems. The good news is that vision therapy can be undertaken at any age: we have treated patients who were in their nineties.

Will I need vision therapy several times throughout my life?
The answer is a qualified no. Occasionally, in cases of exotropia, the patient needs to come back for some retraining, usually for 12 weeks, but it is rare. Usually there is no need for further therapy once it is completed.

What changes can I expect as the therapy progresses?
Most patients notice a distinct difference within the first 12 weeks. As the therapy progresses you can expect improvement in all athletic activities, in ability to read and follow class room instruction, ease of headaches – there are numerous other more or less specific changes that take place. The most significant, however, is a profound change in mood and attitude as life for the patient simply becomes much easier.

Will vision therapy help with sports?
Absolutely. All sports require a high degree of spatial and bodily awareness. Many require eye-hand coordination. To illustrate: Nike has had a much coveted vision training program to help improve the performance of some of the countries top athletes.

I work on a computer most of the day and come home with a head ache – can vision therapy help?
Yes! Looking at a backlit screen at a set distance from the eyes will eventually lead to problems. Usually 12 weeks of vision therapy can solve the problem and teach you how to avoid a recurrence.

Why was vision therapy recommended for my child who gets good grades in school?
Bright children often learn to compensate for their problems. This is hard, stressful and unnecessary – and eventually it becomes too hard.

What is the consequence of untreated vision problems?
Some of the more obvious consequences include: lifelong dislike for reading, uncomfortable vision, headaches, backaches, and bad posture, to name a few.
The more serious consequence is that people with vision problems l never reaches their full potential.